60 Day Europe Bash – The Adriatic

I left Lake Bled in Slovenia May 17 to head to Ljubljana, Slovenia to start begin the second part of my 14-day Rick Steves “Best of the Adriatic” tour back in Ljubljana, Slovenia. This time I’ll have the opportunity to spend more time in Ljubljana than I did during my Rick Steves “Best of Eastern Europe” tour when we spent a dreary afternoon here on our way to Lake Bled.

This tour took me from Ljubljana to Bled and Kobarid in Slovenia; Motovun, Rovinj, Pula, Opatija, back to Plitvice, Split, Hvar, Korcula and Dubrovnik in Croatia and Mostar in Bosnia-Herzegovina.

My 60-Day Europe Bash, April 24 to June 22, 2016, travel blog is in six parts: Berlin, Heart of Europe, Adriatic, Balkans, Vienna and Munich. This is the Adriatic portion of my trip, which included Slovenia, Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina from May 17 to May 31, 2016. Follow along through the photos and captions. 

Took an evening stroll to take in a little of Ljubljana tonight, but I’ll have more time tomorrow. May 17, 2016

Ljubljana, with its distinctive bridges and outdoor cafes along the Ljubljanica River, has an Old World feel with a charming vibe. This is a view of the river and the triple bridge which connects Ljubljana’s historical, medieval town on one bank, and modern Ljubljana on the other.

Although Ljubljana is filled with old world charm architecturally, it also carries a youthful vibe with its hip university atmosphere. But for me, the most intriguing part is the man who came home to Ljubljana, after making a name for himself in Prague, to redesign the city. That man was architect and the urban planner of his day, Jože Plečnik. A man who never married and lived modestly, Plečnik and Ljubljana are intertwined.

The man himself, Jože Plečnik (1872-1957), helped shape the modern look of Ljubljana, Slovenia. Trained as a furniture designer, Plečnik turned to architecture. His simple but eye pleasing designs mixed modern and classical influences. He made a name for himself with his work on the Prague Castle in Prague. But Plečnik returned home to Ljubljana and got to work redesigning the city from libraries to riverside embankments to market halls and bridges, Plečnik left his mark on Ljubljana. May 18, 2016

The landmark Triple Bridge designed by Jože Plečnik in Ljubljana. The Triple Bridge is a group of three bridges across the Ljubljanica River in the city center near Prešeren Square. It connects the Ljubljana’s historical, medieval, town on one bank, and the modern city of Ljubljana, on the other. Plečnik designed the extension of the bridge in 1929 with two footbridges at a slight angle on each side of it. The three bridges are part of the Ljubljana pedestrian-only zone. May 18, 2016

Part of the the landmark Triple Bridge designed by Jože Plečnik in Ljubljana. May 18, 2016

The Ljubljana Central Market in the capital of Slovenia was designed by Jože Plečnik in 1931–39. It is located in the center of Ljubljana and extends from the Triple Bridge to the Dragon Bridge. The market offers agricultural products including fruits, vegetables, meat products, flowers, plants and medicinal herbs. In addition, the market also offers pottery, souvenirs, textiles, footwear and other products. May 18, 2016

The outdoor central market area in Ljubljana also designed by Jože Plečnik. May 18, 2016

The Cobbler’s Bridge in Ljubljana was once where actual shoemakers would set up shop. Although the original bridge is long gone, this columned bridge was designed by Jože Plečnik. May 18, 2016

Our Rick Steves lead guide, Tina, explaining the significance of what could be Jože Plečnik’s masterpiece, the National and University Library in Ljubljana. The red and gray color scheme represents the red soil and the granite of the Karst region, south of Ljubljana. But on a deeper level, the library represents overcoming obstacles to obtain knowledge. May 18, 2016

The Church of St. John and the Baptist and the Trnovo Bridge. The bridge, built between 1929 and 1932, was an important part of Joze Pecnik’s project for the channel. May 18, 2016

This plaque of Fran Saleški Finžgar, to the left and Jože Plečnik is on the outside of the Church of St. John and the Baptist in the Ljubljana’s Trnovo district. Finžgar, a Slovene writer, playwright, translator and Roman Catholic priest, was a close friend and personal advisory of Plecnik’s. When Finžgar served as a priest at the church, Plečnik was his neighbor. And, in the late 1920’s Finžgar commissioned the renovation of the church to Plečnik. May 18, 2016

Inside of the Church of St. John and the Baptist in the Trnovo district of Ljubljana is located in front of architect Joze Plecnik’s home and contains some furnishings designed by him. May 18, 2016

The home of Slovenian architect and urban planner Jože Plečnik at 4 Karunova street in Ljubljana’s Trnovo district. He lived modestly and simply with other family members in other sections of the house. May 18, 2016

The entrance hall to Jože Plečnik’s house in Trnovo across the Trnovo Bridge in Ljubljana. This is where, for 36 years architect and urban planner Plečnik, would greet his guests. May 18, 2016

Another look at the entrance hall to Jože Plečnik’s house in Trnovo across the Trnovo Bridge in Ljubljana. This is where, for 36 years architect and urban planner Plečnik, would greet his guests. May 18, 2016

The work table in the house of Jože Plečnik’s where the Slovenian architect and urban planner lived and worked in Ljubljana. May 18, 2016

In the same room as the work table is this bed and books in the house of Jože Plečnik’s where the Slovenian architect and urban planner lived and worked in Ljubljana. May 18, 2016

The inside and outside garden at Slovenian architect Jože Plečnik’s house in Ljubljana. May 18, 2016

Although Jože Plečnik gave Ljublana its look, Slovenian poet France Prešeren (1800-1849) gave the country it’s romantic soul and national anthem. The mayor outlawed buses and taxis. Although Ljubljana is pedestrian-friendly, it is also bike-friendly and if you’re not aware of your surroundings, you could become easily acquainted with someone on a bike because they seldom slow down. May 18, 2016

In Prešeren Square is the statue of Slovenia’s greatest poet, France Prešeren. His lyrical poetry dealt with the love towards his homeland, the suffering of humanity, as well as his unfulfilled love towards his muse, Julija Primic. May 18, 2016

Although Slovenia’s greatest poet, France Prešeren, wrote about love, his own love was unrequited by his muse, Julija Primic. This shows Julija gazing back toward Prešeren Square however, the daughter of a wealthy merchant married someone wealthy. May 18, 2016

Although this bridge has nothing to do with the poet or the architect, it is still a landmark bridge in Ljubljana, the Dragon Bridge. May 18, 2016

The exterior of the Ljubljana Cathedral in Ljubljana officially named St. Nicholas’s Church. May 18, 2016

Inside the Ljubljana Cathedral, towards the main nave, much of the original Baroque decor remains with frescoes painted by Giulio Quaglio between 1703–1706 and later 1721–1723. May 18, 2916

Inside the Ljubljana Cathedral. May 18, 2016

The frescoed ceiling of the Ljubljana Cathedral. May 18, 2016 

Our Rick Steves tour guide, Tina Hilti, pointing to the sculpted bronze door entrances which were created in 1996 for the 1250s anniversary of Christianity in the Slovenian territory and the visit of Pope John Paul II. The front door, now named the Slovene Door. This side door, now named the Ljubljana Door, is decorated with portraits of the 20th-century bishops of Ljubljana. May 18, 2016

One of four dragons at the beginning and the end of the landmark Dragon Bridge in Ljubljana. The Dragon is a symbol of Ljubljana’s strength. May 18, 2016

Again, another bridge that has nothing to do with the poet or architect, but I just liked it. For whatever reason, this is called the “Ugly Duckling” bridge in Ljubljana but the view from the bridge and the architecture on both sides of the Ljubljanica River is anything but ugly. May 18, 2016

I’m in Bovec, Slovenia, tonight. It’s a completely different world from the city of Ljubljana, with its Julian Alps mountain views and pristine Soca River flowing through its canyons. Today, we hopped on our very comfy Rick Steves tour bus, and met our bus driver Tomaz, to head out of the city of Ljubljana with a stop in Bled, Slovenia, to visit the castle and time to take in the sights and a walk around the serene Lake Bled. Then it was back on the bus to the Julian Alps making our way up and down the hairpin curves and stunning views of Vrsic Pass before making our way to Bovec for the night. Tomorrow, we make our way to Croatia.

Back in Lake Bled, Slovenia for a few hours to see the sites. This time I made it up to Bled’s cliff-hanging castle…or should I say the bus drove us up to the castle where we saw amazing panoramic views of Bled, the lake and the island. The castle’s history goes back to 1011. May 19, 2016

The Lake Bled Castle in Slovenia. May 19, 2016

Back in Bled, Slovenia, for a couple of hours. This time I walked the 3.5 miles around Lake Bled and truly enjoyed the calm and peace of the walk and the spectacular views of Bled island, the castle and the snow capped Julian Alps. May 19, 2016

Me and tour mate Susan, along with her husband Joe, walked the 3.5 miles around the lake. Here Susan and I are trying to stay warm as the weather starts to cool off at Lake Bled, Slovenia, after our walk. May 19, 2016

A stop along the way to Bovec, Slovenia, was at this colorful and historic behave in Breznica, Slovenia, created by apiarist and painter Anton Jansa (1734-1773). This is our Rick Steves guide, Tina telling the story of this beehive. In bee-keeping Jansa is noted for changing the size and shape of hives to a form where they can be stacked together like blocks. As a painter he also decorated the fronts of hives with paintings. To date, the beehive has been renovated several times, mainly the oak beams and some of the painted beehive panels. May 19, 2016

A closer look at the artwork of apiarist and painter Anton Jansa’s beehive in Breznica, Slovenia. May 19, 2016

A closer look at the artwork of apiarist and painter Anton Jansa’s beehive in Breznica, Slovenia. May 19, 2016

Driving along the Slovenian mountainside brought us to the Vrsic Pass of the Triglav National Park where our Rick Steves bus driver managed some 50 hairpin turns. The views were simply amazing. May 19, 2016

On our way up the Vrsic Pass in the Triglav National Park is this little Russian chapel. The road used to travel the park was built during World War I by some 10,000 Russian soldiers who lived and worked in terrible conditions, hundreds of whom died from illness and exposure. In 1916, an avalanche killed more than 300 workers. The chapel was built in honor of their memory. May 19, 2016

Our Rick Steves tour bus stopped at this Soca River Canyon, close to our hotel and final stop in Bovec, Slovenia, so we could see the emerald-colored water from a bouncy suspension bridge. May 19, 2016

Me on the bouncy suspension bridge at the Soca River Canyon enjoying the emerald-colored water and mountain views…while holding on for dear life. May 19, 2016

We said goodbye to Bovec, Slovenia, as we made our way to Motovun, Croatia. During our journey to Croatia, we made several stops along the way in Slovenia including a stop at the World War II Museum, the Kobarid Museum in Kobarid, Slovenia and stopped for a a late lunch at a Slovenian winery…which meant lots of good wine tasting and a tour of the winery.

The town of Kobarid is mainly known for the aftermath of the Battle of Kobarid in October 1917. During the Second World War, Kobarid was the centre of the liberated territory, called the Kobarid Republic. The Museum entrance, with our museum guide Zeljko, introduces visitors to portraits of soldiers killed in the war. May 20, 2016

Another stop along the way to Croatia was here at Brda, Slovenia. May 20, 2016

The town of Brda, Slovenia. May 20, 2016

The Boris Lisjak Winery in Dutovlje, Slovenia. May 20, 2016

Taking a tour of the wine cellars of the Boris Lisjak Winery in Dutovlje, Slovenia, with our guide Tina to the right. May 20, 2016

Our guide Tina and the man of the hour, the winemaker and winery owner himself, Boris Lisjak, telling us about his wine, as our guide Tina, does the translating. That’s tour members Joe and Susan to the left and Dennis to the right. May 20, 2016

Tour members Carol to the left of me and Julie to the right of me enjoying our wine tasting and treats at the Boris Lisjak Winery in Dutovlje, Slovenia. May 20, 2015

On the Rick Steves tour bus heading to Motovun, Croatia. May 20, 2016

Although the bus took our group up most of the way to our hotel in Motovun, we ended up having to do the rest of the walk on our own. Part of the walk up is being able to enter thru these ancient city gates. May 20, 2016

Our tour group is staying at the Kastel Hotel in Motovun, Croatia, a former castle on a steep hillside with panoramic views. May 20, 2016

A nice glass of wine, my iPad to do my writing and my camera to capture the beauty of my travels while the sun sets on Motovun, Croatia. May 20, 2016

It was a full day of meandering through Istria, the westernmost part of Croatia, which included the ancient sites in Pula to the quaint, yet touristy Rovinj. Add sunshine, blue skies and the warm Mediterranean climate….all while staying in a former castle on the hillside of Motovun, Croatia, located on a steep hillside with panoramic views, and you have the perfect ingredients for an amazing day.

The yellow St. Stephen’s church and tower next to our hotel on the hillside of Motovun, Croatia. A steep, bricked and twisty road leads up to this area of the old town. May 21, 2016

A view of slate roofed houses from the ramparts on the hillside of Motovun, Croatia. May 21, 2016

The painting on the side of a building along the ramparts in Motovun, Croatia, is this painting of Veli Joze which is based on a literary work by Croatian writer Vladimir Nazor written in 1908. The main character is a brave and good gian named Joze, who lives in the vicinity of Motovun. Good giant Veli Joze has become the folk symbol of strength and power. The book was based on folk stories and folk motifs. May 21, 2016

The other side of the city gate in Motovun, Croatia showing restaurants and front row seats to gorgeous views. May 21, 2016

A view of the hillside village of Motovun, Croatia, our home last night and again tonight. May 21, 2016

Our wonderful Rick Steves “The Best of the Adriatic” tour group, which includes our incredible tour guide Tina (front row kneeling 2nd from the left) and our hairpin turning bus driver Tomaz (front row kneeling 2nd from the right) with the hillside village of Motovun, Croatia, is behind us. May 21, 2016

Although the Colosseum in Rome is bigger and held more participants, the Pula, Croatia, amphitheater is considered to be the best preserved. Built entirely from local limestone, around 70 A.D., the amphitheater was designed to host gladiator contests. Pula, a seafront city on the tip of Croatia’s Istrian Peninsula, is known for its protected harbor, ship harbor, ship building, beach-lined coast and Roman ruins. May 21, 2016

Me inside the magnificent amphitheater in Pula, Croatia. Of the dozens of amphitheaters left around Europe by Roman engineers, Pula’s is the 6th largest and best-preserved. The newer looking tower of the amphitheater is original, it was cleaned and that took two years to accomplish. May 21, 2016

A close up of the amphitheater tower in Pula, Croatia. This is one of the best preserved amphitheatres from antiquity and is still in use today. May 21, 2016

An underground exhibit at the Pula, Croatia, amphitheater of amphora vessels. Amphorae are specific vessels that were used for storing and transporting olive oil, wine, salted fish and preserved fruit. They were also used for building as construction and insulating material, as well as for filling in swampy areas. The characteristic Istrian amphora has a very pronounced egg-shaped body with long neck narrower than the body and small handles on opposite sides. May 21, 2016

This is a would be parking garage near the old town of Pula, Croatia. Would be because when the person who bought it got ready to clear the land, Roman ruins were found. May 21, 2016

The Cathedral of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Pula, Croatia. The site of the present-day church has been used for religious worship since ancient Roman times and the first Christian churches on the site were built in the late 4th and early 5th century AD. In 1709, stone was taken from the Pula amphitheater for the bell tower foundations of the cathedral. This was the last time the arena was used as a source of stone. May 21, 2016

A statue of Irish novelist and poet James Joyce sits at a restaurant in the old town of Pula, Croatia. Joyce lived in Pula for six months between October 1904 and March 1905 teaching English to Austrian officers at the time. May 21, 2016

Arch of the Sergii is an Ancient Roman triumphal arch located in Pula, Croatia. The arch commemorates three brothers of the Sergii family specifically Lucius Sergius Lepidus, a tribune serving in the twenty-ninth legion that participated in the Battle of Actium and disbanded in 27 BC . This suggests an approximate date of construction: 29-27 BC.The arch stood behind the original naval gate of the early Roman colony. The Sergii were a powerful family of officials in the colony and retained their power for centuries. The “Golden Gate” was erected between the years 29 and 27 BC by the Sergi family, in honor of three members of the family who held important positions in Pula at that time. James Joyce taught in a school previously housed in the yellow building next to the arch. May 21, 2016

Cleaning up after the bombing of World War II, locals found these mosaics under the block of houses around the Chapel of St. Maria Formosa in Pula’s old town. The well preserved mosaic covered the floor of a central room of a Roman house, probably from the 3rd century. It has been preserved as is, which means the Roman floor level was about six feet below today’s level. May 21, 2016

Back in Rovinj, Croatia, for the second time…the first time was when I spent two nights here on the island of Katarina during my Rick Steves “Best of Eastern Europe,” tour and again today for a couple of hours during my Rick Steves “Best of the Adriatic” tour. It feels like a relaxing Italian seaside village, so coming back again today was just wonderful. Rovinj is the kind of place where you can get lost in the alleyways or be mesmerized by the boats bobbing in the harbor. It is truly lovely. May 21, 2016

Just one of the quaint alleyways in Rovinj, Croatia. May 21, 2016

This is actually part of the Valentino Restaurant where you can sit by Adriatic Sea in Rovinj, Croatia. May 21, 2016

Another cute alleyway in Rovinj, Croatia. May 21, 2016

Took a little time to enjoy Rovinj, Croatia, at this restaurant. May 21, 2016

And, this was my view at the restaurant in Rovinj, Croatia. May 21, 2016

The gorgeous town of Rovinj, Croatia. May 21, 2016

The gorgeous town of Rovinj, Croatia. May 21, 2016

Our tour group having dinner at this family run restaurant, Konobo Astarea, just a 30-minute drive from Motovun, Croatia. May 21, 2016

Alma, an owner and the chef at the Konobo Astarea, is cooking over an open flamed stove. May 21, 2016

This was actually the third course of our group dinner tonight with the first two courses of pasta and beef goulash. Throw in wine, schnapps and an apple strudel for dessert and you have the makings of a full belly. May 21, 2016

Thankfully, we get to burn those calories from our hearty dinner with a walk up to our hotel, the former castle, in Motovun, Croatia, on a bricked, curved road and through this defensive gate. Good night, Motovun. Tomorrow we get a bit of a late start, but it’s pretty much a full day on the bus until we get to Plitvice National Park, Croatia, for the night. May 21, 2016

Today was about getting from one place to the next. That meant leaving my hillside former castle hotel in Motovun, Croatia, and heading to Plitvice Lakes National Park. We did make some stops along the way, including the one in Opatija, Croatia, for a couple of hours during lunchtime.

I decided to just sit a spell to enjoy the surroundings and the beautiful weather, while eating a picnic-type lunch (something the Europeans do) at Park Svetog Jakova or Saint James’s Park. Behind me, in the park, is the oldest building in Opatija, the Church of St. Jakov. Originally a Benedictine abbey, it’s mentioned in historic documents dating back to 1449. This is also where the town got its name…opatija means “abbey” in Croatian. Saint Jacob’s church, built in 1506 and enlarged in 1937, now stands on the same spot as the abbey. May 22, 2016

A view of what I saw today as I was sitting in the Park Svetog Jakova or Saint James’s Park in Opatija, Croatia, while enjoying my picnic lunch. May 22, 2016

Opatija, Croatia, on the Istrian peninsula, is a popular summer and winter resort. May 22, 2016

Not sure what this building is, but I just loved the look of it and the beautiful red roses in Opatija, Croatia. May 22, 2016

She is called the “Maiden with the Seagull.” Located on a promenade in Opatija, Croatia, she was erected in 1956. The Maiden is the work of academic sculptor Zvonka Car. Although there are different stories attached to her presence, suffice it to say, she elegantly stands on Opatija’s coastline to welcome visitors. The seagull in her hand is part of the sculpture but the seagull on top of her head landed there…I guess…as a good spot to find lunch. May 22, 2016

Upon arrival at our hotel in Plitvice Lakes National Park in Croatia, our delightful tour group leader, Tina, suggested an outdoor happy hour picnic before dinner that included wine and a few treats. May 22, 2016

I’m at the halfway mark of my 60-day Central and Eastern Europe trek and my Rick Steves “Best of the Adriatic” tour group has landed in Split, Croatia, for the next two nights. When I reflect about all I’ve seen and done, in the past 30 days, I’m amazed. One of the things our tour group did today, which I also did on my previous “Best of Eastern Europe” tour, was to walk/hike Plitvice Lake National Park in Croatia. On my last visit, it rained, but not today and that made it a whole new eye opening and frankly beautiful experience. Plus, I made it through without a scratch…yes, during the last visit, I took a spill and bruised my right knee…but all is better now. Looking forward to tomorrow when we explore Split and the Roman ruins of Emperor Diocletian’s Palace.

Me at the Plitvice Lake National Park in Croatia enjoying a beautiful walk/hike with the sun shining. May 23, 2016

Plitvice Lake National Park in Croatia. May 23, 2016

Plitvice Lake National Park in Croatia. May 23, 2016

Plitvice Lake National Park in Croatia. May 23, 2016

Plitvice Lake National Park in Croatia. May 23, 2016

Me on the boat crossing over to the other side of the lake at Plitvice Lake National Park in Croatia. May 23, 2016

Our tour group on the boat crossing over to the other side of the lake at Plitvice Lake National Park in Croatia. May 23, 2016

It’s laundry day in Split, Croatia, and with 30 days more to go of travel, I needed to get laundry done. Here we are in front of our hotel, getting ready to head to dinner…but first we just had to show off our dirty clothes. May 23, 2016

After dinner there was gelato, after gelato there was a walk on “The Riva,” the seaside pedestrian promenade and after that our tour group ended up here at the Peristyle, the main square of Diocletian’s Palace (more on this tomorrow) listening to a two man band singing and playing wonderful 70’s…that’s 1970’s music. Sitting in this square tonight while listening to music in Split, Croatia, was quite a magical moment for me. May 23, 2016

It turned out to be a cool and rainy day in Split, Croatia, today but our group toured the Roman ruins of Diocletian’s Palace. Built as a retirement palace by the Roman Emperor Diocletian at the turn of the 4th century A.D., the palace and the old town portion of the city are pretty much intertwined.

After today’s tour was over at noon, it was free time so I picked up my laundry, enjoyed wine and cheese with tour members Susan and Joe and then I took the day off and chilled out. Sometimes you just have to take a vacation from your vacation and today was that kind of a day.

The outer facade of Diocletian’s Palace complex by the Riva, a waterfront pedestrian promenade that’s lined with umbrellaed cafes and palm trees in Split, Croatia. May 24, 2016

An Adriatic seaside view in Split, Croatia. May 24, 2016

A photo rendering of what Diocletian’s Palace, on the UNESCO list of World Heritage since 1979, looked like. Emperor Diocletian, who was in poor health, returned to Split for the medicinal sulfur spring. The palace took about 11 years to build and more than 2,000 slaves died during the construction. Considered as the best preserved imperial palace, it is at the core of the medieval town. May 24, 2016

With preserved Roman structures, this basement hall in Diocletian’s Palace, Split, Croatia, was used in the film scenes of HBO’s “Game of Thrones.” May 24, 2016

These beams of wood, dated from 295 to 305 A.D., were discovered under the floor level of the Diocletian Palace substructure in Split, Croatia. May 24, 2016

Diocletian brutally persecuted his Christian subjects. Just before he moved to the Dalmatian Coast, he had Bishop Domnius of Salona killed, along with several thousand Christians. May 24, 2016

The basement hall of Diocletian’s Palace in Split, Croatia. May 24, 2016

The altar of the Cathedral of St. Domnius in Split, Croatia, which was originally Diocletian’s mausoleum, was built in the 4th century. But after the fall of Rome, it’s was converted into a cathedral. May 24, 2016

The Cathedral of St. Domnius in Split, Croatia, which was originally Diocletian’s mausoleum, was built in the 4th century. But after the fall of Rome, it’s was converted into a cathedral. May 24, 2016

Croatian artist Andrija Buvina carved two wooden cathedral doors in 1214 AD, which are still in place today at the Cathedral of St. Domnius in Split, Croatia. The fascinating Romanesque handicraft showcases 14 images illustrating the life of Jesus Christ with elements of gold plating. May 24, 2016

The most remarkable and distinguished part of Diocletian’s Palace is the Peristyle square in Split, Croatia. The Peristyle, the central part of Diocletian’s Palace, has become the main public square, the center of various civil, religious, public and administrative activities. May 24, 2016

This black Sphinx in Split, Croatia’s Peristyle square is the only one still predominantly intact that’s one of Diocletian’s collections of 13. May 24, 2016

The ornate bell tower of the Cathedral of St. Domnius, which began in the 13th century, is quite the centerpiece in Peristyle square in Split, Croatia. May 24, 2016

Jupiter’s Temple, which was later converted into a baptistery and renamed St. John’s Baptistery in Split, Croatia. May 24, 2016

Inside and to the back of the former Jupiter’s Temple turned St. John’s Baptistery in Split, Croatia is the large bronze statue of saint Jean-Baptiste, a late work of Ivan Meštrović carried out in 1954. Mestrovic was a renowned Croatian sculptor and architect of the 20th century. May 24, 2016

Our city tour guide, Maja, inside the former Jupiter’s Temple turned St. John’s Baptistery in Split, Croatia. May 24, 2016

A passageway in Diocletian’s Palace in Split, Croatia. May 24, 2016

The Golden Gate was the main entry of Diocletian’s Palace in Split, Croatia. May 24, 2016

This huge statue/sculpture of Bishop Gregory Nin is the work of Ivan Mestrovic. The 10th century Croatian priest tried to convince the Vatican to allow Mass to be said in Croatian rather than Latin. Mestrovic was a renowned Croatian sculptor and architect of the 20th century. After the end of World War II, unwilling to live under Communism, Mestrovic relocated to the United States where he became a citizen. May 24, 2016

This piazza square at the center of Split’s Old Town, which includes the Town Hall to the left and clock tower to the right. May 24, 2016

This piazza square at the center of Split’s Old Town, which includes the Town Hall to the left and clock tower to the right. May 24, 2016

A quaint square in Split, Croatia’s Old Town. May 24, 2016

This painting is on the wall of the Hotel Globo in Split, Croatia. May 24, 2016

It was a day of island hopping by way of a ferry and a catamaran in what was ideal weather. We said good-bye yesterday morning to Split, Croatia, when our tour group hopped on a ferry and glided through the still and beautiful Adriatic Sea to the island of Hvar, Croatia. I’m not sure if it was the gorgeous day that added to the beauty of Hvar or if it was the island’s quaint charm and Venetian feel that mesmerized me, but it was a lovely way to spend an afternoon. And before we got too comfortable, it was time to hop on a catamaran to the island of Korcula where our tour bus and driver, Tomaz, were waiting to take us to our hotel just outside of Korcula’s old town.

Me, yesterday morning on the ferry heading out of Split, Croatia. May 25, 2016

Saying good-bye to Split, Croatia, and Diocletian’s Palace from the ferry as we head to the island of Hvar, Croatia, for the afternoon. May 25, 2016

Our Rick Steves tour group on the ferry as we head to the island of Hvar, Croatia. From left, Julie, John, Barbara, Joe, Susan and our energetic lead guide, Tina. May 25, 2016

On the island of Hvar in Croatia is this main piazza called St. Stephen’s Square. It is dominated by the cathedral, bell tower and further down by the harbor are a variety of cafes and restaurants. May 25, 2016

Although this passageway looks very much like it would belong in an Arabian nights movie, it actually leads from the St. Stephen’s Square in Hvar, Croatia, to the Benedictine Convent and further up to the 14th century fortress. May 25, 2016

The Benedictine Convent is where the nuns make these wonderfully intricate and delicate pieces of lace art by using fibers from the agava…a cactus-like plant. May 25, 2016

Samples of the delicate lace made by the nuns of the Benedictine Convent on the island of Hvar, Croatia, using fibers from the agava, a cactus-like plant with flat, long, leaves. May 25, 2016

The view overlooking the Hvar, Croatia, harbor as I’m heading to the 14th century fortress on the top of the hillside. The views of the water, boats and rooftops, on this gorgeous day, were absolutely stunning. May 25, 2016

The 14th century fortress on the highest point of the island of Hvar, Croatia. May 25, 2016

Proof that several of us from the tour made it up the steps and windy passageway to the dramatic views on the highest point of the island to the 14th century fortress in Hvar, Croatia. From left is Barbara, me, Carol, Dennis and John. May 25, 2016

Back to the beautiful water and bobbing boats of the Hvar, Croatia, harbor with a view of the 14th century fortress on the hillside. May 25, 2016

My tour group waiting on the island of Hvar, Croatia for our catamaran to the island of Korcula where our tour bus and driver, Tomaz will be waiting to take us to our hotel. May 25, 2016

The inside of the catamaran taking us from the island of Hvar, Croatia to the island of Korcula, Croatia. May 25, 2016

Although it was a free day from planned tour group activities, that didn’t mean laying in bed all day. The Korcula, Croatia’s, old town with its stone archways, narrow winding lanes, outer wall and towers was a joy to just meander through. Getting to the old town was less than a 10 minute walk from our hotel…the Marco Polo. Yes, there are gift shops, a restaurant and even a Marco Polo Museum in Korcula. The medieval Venetian merchant and traveler is reputed to have been born in Korcula. Fact or fiction, I have no idea, but the Polo force is strong in Korcula.

Although there were no set plans for the day, the evening brought the group together for a relaxing and picturesque boat ride along the Adriatic Sea. Then afterwards, I got caught up in the magic of the Corpus Christi celebration procession that began in the old town at St. Mark’s Square. The boat ride and the religious procession was a beautiful way to end the day and our stay in Korcula. Tomorrow, we head to Mostar, Bosnia.

The Great Lane Date’s grand staircase…the doorway to Korcula, Croatia’s medieval old town. May 26, 2016

The church Sveti Mihovil is located opposite of the Municipal Hall in the old town of Korcula, Croatia. It was first mentioned in documents in. 1408 and restored in 1615. Inside the church is a Renaissance pulpit. May 26, 2016

Inside of th Sveti Mihovil. Church in old town Korcula, Croatia. May 26, 2016

This is another church in Korcula, Croatia’s old town. The The Church of OUr Lady,, which. Dates from the 16th century. is located in the old town’s main square. Old gravestones are dotted along the Church’s floor. The flag column to the. Side of the church dates from 1515. The church is used as a fine arts gallery fr local artists Toms of historical Korcula families are buried toward the entrance of the church. The decorative pillar next to the church dates back from the 16th century. The carvings are said to be some of Korcula’s old family arms. May 26, 2016

The church of our lady in the old town of. Korcula.. The altar was made in the 18th century but the mosaics behind the altar on the. Wall were lady by contemporary artists in early. 1960s. May 26, 2016

The church of our lady in the old town of. Korcula.. The altar was made in the 18th century but the mosaics behind the altar on the. Wall were lady by contemporary artists in early. 1960s. May 26, 2016

Gabrielis Palace, built in the 16th century Renaissance style, currently houses the Korcula Town Museum in the old town in Korcula, Croatia’s, St Mark’s Square. May 26, 2016

The Bishop’s Palace in Korcula, Croatia, houses the Bishop’s Treasury Museum in the old town of St. Mark’s Square. May 26, 2016

One of the many arched and narrow passageways in the old town of Korcula, Croatia. May 26, 2016

A restaurant, named after Marco Polo, a Venetian merchant and traveller. Although Korcula, Croatia, lays claim as Marco Polo’s birthplace, evidently so does Venice. The Venetian merchant is quite popular in Korcula with gift shops, a museum, restaurant and even a hotel baring his name. May 26, 2016

The Marco Polo gift shop window, where a variety of statues, salts, lavenders, magnets and journals are sold. The gift shop is across from the entrance to Marco Polo’s alleged house of birth in Korcula, Croatia. The bust is said to be of Marco Polo. May 26, 2016

The upstairs tower is said to be Marco Polo’s alleged house of birth in Korcula, Croatia. The green gate to the right leads to the house, which was not open. A sign by the green gate reads: Marco Polo House…Born in Korcula 1254…Died in Venice 1324. May 26, 2016

The Marco Polo Museum and gift shop facing the harbor where the old town of Korcula, Croatia, meets mainland. May 26, 2016

The ramparts of old town Korcula, Croatia, is now a promenade with restaurants and a stunning view of the Adriatic Sea. May 26, 2016

The ramparts of old town Korcula, Croatia, is now a promenade with restaurants and a stunning view of the Adriatic Sea. May 26, 2016

Our Rick Steves tour group boarding our boat for a ride on the Adriatic Sea around the island of Korcula, Croatia. May 26, 2016

The towers and the walls of old town Korcula, Croatia, from our boat ride on the Adriatic Sea. May 26, 2016

Me on our tour group’s boat ride on the Adriatic Sea around the island of Korcula, Croatia. May 26, 2016

After this evening tour group boat ride I was able to catch the Corpus Christi celebration procession that began at the Cathedral Sveti Marko or St. Mark’s Cathedral in the old town of St. Mark’s Square in Korcula, Croatia. Corpus Christi is a Christian observance that honors the Holy Eucharist. It is also known as the Feast of the Most Holy Body of Christ, as well as the Day of Wreaths. May 26, 2016

The Corpus Christi celebration procession that began at the Cathedral Sveti Marko or St. Mark’s Cathedral in the old town of St. Mark’s Square in Korcula, Croatia. May 26, 2016

The Cathedral Sveti Marko or St. Mark’s Cathedral in the old town of St. Mark’s Square in Korcula, Croatia, was built in the Gothic-Renaissance style and completed in 15th century. May 26, 2016

Inside of St. Mark’s Cathedral in the old town of St. Mark’s Square in Korcula, Croatia. May 26, 2016

The main altar of St. Mark’s Cathedral in the old town of St. Mark’s Square in Korcula, Croatia, with an original Jacopo Tintoretto painting. Tintoretto (1518 to 1594) was an Italian painter and a notable exponent of the Renaissance school. The painting depicts St. Mark between St. Bartholomew and St. Jerome. May 26, 2016

Our hotel…the Marco Polo Hotel…in Korcula, Croatia, is located within a ten minute walk of the old town. May 26, 2016Having spent two weeks in Turkey last year, being in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina, has the feel and look of a Turkish town but it’s history and the smattering of church steeples and mosque minarets makes it uniquely Mostar.

Mostar has long been known for its old Turkish houses and Old Bridge or Stari Most. Mostar acquired its name from the bridge-keepers, the mostari. Developed in the 15th and 16th centuries as an Ottoman frontier town and during the Austro-Hungarian period in the 19th and 20th centuries, Mostar spans the Neretva River.

However, most of the historic town and the Old Bridge were destroyed during the 1990s conflict. Mostar is still rebuilding from the 1990s conflict that saw the armies of the Catholic Croats, Orthodox Serbs and Muslim Bosniaks, who once lived in peace together, came apart during the war.

The Old Bridge was recently rebuilt and many of the edifices in the Old Town have been restored or rebuilt with the contribution of international committees established by UNESCO.

The Karagözbey Mosque in the old town of Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina was built in the mid 1550s and close to a park turned into a cemetery in 1993 when the dead needed a place to be buried and other cemeteries were inaccessible due to the war. The mosque was severely damaged during World War II, and faced near destruction during the Bosnian War in the early 1990s. However, Karagözbey Mosque, like the rest of Mostar, underwent extensive repairs between 2002 and 2004. May 27, 2016

Some scars of the war during the early 1990’s still remain in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. May 27, 2016

The New Muslim Cemetery in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina was a park before the war but became a cemetery because locals needed to bury loved ones who mostly died from 1993 to 1995. May 27, 2016

I have a thing for bridges, especially pedestrian bridges. I’m not entirely sure why, but I know a part of that lies in their basic function…to bring two separate entities together. The iconic Old Bridge or Stari Most has spanned the Neretva River for more than four centuries. This new Old Bridge was built in 2004 after the 1557 bridge, commissioned by the Ottoman Sultan Suleyman the Magnificent, was destroyed in the Bosnian war. May 27, 2016

Walking through the lively Coppersmiths Street in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina, with its narrow passageway and stoned ground while also packed with tourists is basically like walking through a Turkish bazaar. May 27, 2016

The Bosnian War took place in Bosnia and Herzegovina between 1992 and 1995. The most recent estimates suggest that around 100,000 people were killed during the war and more than 2.2 million people were displaced. May 27, 2018

Enjoying dinner with tour mates in the old town of Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. From left me, Mae and Joe. May 27, 2016

My Rick Steves “Best of the Adriatic” tour members enjoying a delicious dinner in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. From left, Mae, Joe, Susan and Jim. May 27, 2016

Enjoying my traditional Bosnian feast for dinner in old town Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina along with a beer called “Radler,” which has lemon in it. May 27, 2016

A view of the pedestrian walkway of the Old Bridge in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. May 27, 2016

Another side and view of the Old Bridge in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. May 27, 2016

Me last night in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina with the iconic Old Bridge glowing in the background. Although this is the reconstruction of the 16th century Ottoman bridge which stood for 427 years until it was destroyed during the Bosnian war in 1993. The reconstruction took place in 2004. May 27, 2016

It was a full day of three Bosnian cities, three weddings and landing on the pearl of the Adriatic. Even though our Rick Steves tour group left Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovenia, early yesterday morning, we spent the early part of the day visiting three Bosnian cities all working, on different levels, to rebuild from the war: Blagaj, Stolac and Trebinje.

Yesterday’s walk through the past and the rebuilding of the cities was a powerful reminder of the fact that war can only destroy. So does hate, walls and segregation. And, in a very happenstance of a way, love also made itself known as our group witnessed not just one, but three weddings. The whole day reminded me of the lyrics to Marvin Gaye’s, What’s going on song: “You see, war is not the answer for only love can conquer hate.”

Tonight is our farewell dinner which concludes our 14-day Rick Steves “Best of the Adriatic” tour. Tomorrow most of the group leaves to head home, but not me, I’l be spending an extra day in Dubrovnik.

With our city tour guide, Ado, we visited the Tekke, also known as the Dervish monastery. Built on a cliff face in the 15th century, the Tekke is located at the spring of the Buna River in the small village of Blagaj, just south of Mostar in Bosnia and Herzegovina. May 28, 2016

The interior of the Tekke, a 15th century Dervish monastery located at the spring of the Buna River in the small village of Blagaj, just south of Mostar in Bosnia and Herzegovina. May 28, 2016

We had to take off our shoes and the women had to wear a scarf to enter the Tekke, a 15th century Dervish monastery located at the spring of the Buna River in the small village of Blagaj, just south of Mostar in Bosnia and Herzegovina. I did the same last year when entering mosques in Turkey. May 28, 2016

After visiting the Tekke, several tour members and I enjoyed Turkish coffee with Turkish delight in Blagaj, Bosnia and Herzegovina. From left Susan, Joe, me and Dennis. May 28, 2016

Me after visiting the Tekke, I enjoyed Turkish coffee with Turkish delight in Blagaj, Bosnia and Herzegovina. May 28, 2016

The necropolis, a cluster of centuries-old traditional Bosnian tombstones called stećaks at Radmilja in Stolac, Bosnia and Herzegovina. These stećak tombstones, from the 13th to 15th centuries, are carved with epitaphs, detailed portraits of the deceased, and motifs such as grape vines, hunting scenes, and wild animals. May 28, 2016

The necropolis, a cluster of centuries-old traditional Bosnian tombstones called stećaks at Radmilja in Stolac, Bosnia and Herzegovina. These stećak tombstones, from the 13th to 15th centuries, are carved with epitaphs, detailed portraits of the deceased, and motifs such as grape vines, hunting scenes, and wild animals. May 28, 2016

Our local guide Ado took our tour group for walks through the villages of Blagaj and Stolac in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Ado, a young English literature professor, with such warmth and kindness spoke about the difficulties him and his family faced when they were expelled from their home in Blagaj during the war. At the time, his father, who was a carpenter by trade also became a soldier and his mother worked as a nurse in a makeshift hospital. Today, he works to educate others and rebuild his community, including this mosque in Stolac which was rebuilt with the help of volunteers. May 28, 2016

The physical scars of the war, including a bombed out building, are still present in Stolac, Bosnia and Herzegovina. May 28, 2016

This former tobacco factory, no longer in business, also bares the scars of the war with both big and small bullet and mortar holes in it in the village of Stolac, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Stolac was particularly hard-hit during the war when it was taken over by Croat forces and its majority Muslim residents were forced to flee. May 28, 2016

This fortified tower and medieval city of Stolac, Bosnia and Herzegovina, is located on the hillside above the modern city. It was overgrown but a group of volunteers worked to clear the overgrowth. May 28, 2016

The beautiful luncheon feast prepared for us at a small restaurant in Stolac, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Our wonderful lead guide, Tina, explaining to us what the feast included. And, in all honesty, all I heard is Baklava, which I love. May 28, 2016

This is the gorgeous Orthodox church in Trebinje, Bosnia and Herzegovina, that was built between 1888 and 1908 where two weddings took place. May 28, 2016

As we were about to enter the Catholic Orthodox Church in Trebinje, Bosnia and Herzegovenia, we found out that a wedding had just taken place and got there at the perfect time to see the bride and groom leave the church. May 28, 2016

And just when the first wedding at the Orthodox Church n Trebinje, Bosnia and Herzegovenia, was finishing, this second ceremony began soon after. May 28, 2016

Inside the Orthodox Church in Trebinje, Bosnia and Herzegovina, which was built between 1888 and 1908. The congregation stands during the service with the men standing to the right and the women to the left. Our group stock in the back during this second wedding ceremony. May 28, 2016

A close up of the frescos inside the Orthodox Church in Trebinje, Bosnia and Herzegovina. May 28, 2016

At St. Blaise, a Baroque church in Dubrovnik, Croatia, built, like most churches in the city, following the 1667 earthquake and fire. The wedding party, guests and us nosey tourists gathered outside the church to await the newly married couple leaving the church. May 28, 2016

For the third wedding of the day, I must say, this one outside of St. Blaise’s Church in Dubrovnik, Croatia, was utterly beautiful in every way, the time, the place even the weather. Here we are, the wedding party, guests and us nosey tourists outside the church as the newly married couple came down the stairs of the church. May 28, 2016

Having pizza with tour members at XXX in Dubrovnik. May 28, 2016

The St. Blaise Church during a night walk in the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 28, 2016

An evening walk through the main promenade of the old town in Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 28, 2016

Before saying good-bye last night to my Rick Steves “Best of the Adriatic” tour mates during our farewell dinner, we started our day with a walking tour of the old town in Dubrovnik, Croatia. A destination of cruise ships and tour groups like ours, Dubrovnik’s old town can get pretty crowded, pretty fast so an early morning walk put us just ahead of the crowd. Nicknamed the Pearl of the Adriatic, with it’s Venetian feel and the gleaming Adriatic Sea as a backdrop, is well earned.

The main promenade of the old town in Dubrovnik, Croatia, after entering through the Pile Gate. Officially called the Placa, but better known as the Stradun, this street currently filled with shops and restaurants began in the 7th century as a canal. May 29, 2016

The houses on the main promenade or Placa in the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. These were built after the 1667 earthquake and fire. May 29, 2016

Looking towards the Luza Square in the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. The building in the middle with the ground-floor arches, the Sponza Palace, holds the city’s archives. May 29, 2016

The Luza Square with the Sponza Palace to the left now holds the city’s archives and the town’s Bell Tower to the right in the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 29, 2016

The Rector’s Palace to the left and the side of Dubrovnik Cathedral ahead and to the right in the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 29, 2016

The St. Blaise Church with the statue of Orlando in front of the church in the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. The church is dedicated to Dubrovnik’s patron saint. The church, like most of the churches in the town was built following the 1667 earthquake and fire. Orlando was used as a symbol of a city under the protection of the Hungarian-Croatian King. May 29, 2016

Inside of the St. Blaise Church in the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 29, 2016

A close up of the altar of the St. Blaise Church in the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 29, 2016

The Dubrovnik Cathedral, the Cathedral of the Assumption, in its 18th century Roman Baroque version in the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. The original 12th century cathedral which was largely funded by the English King Richard the Lionhearted after he was shipwrecked and rescued in Dubrovnik. At the time, it was the finest Romanesque church on the Adriatic before it was destroyed in 1667 by the earthquake and fire. May 29, 2016

Inside the Dubrovnik Cathedral in Croatia. The main altar, which is being renovated, holds a triptych of the “Ascension of Mary” by Titian, circa 1550. May 29, 2016

The altar of St. John, in the Dubrovnik Cathedral in Croatia, is made from purble marble in Nordic-Baroque style and is simply breathtaking. May 29, 2016

A baptism had taken place at the Dubrovnik Cathedral in Croatia at the baptismal fountain. May 29, 2016

The Church of St Ignatius is located close to the southern edge of the old town in Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 29, 2016

The interior of the Church of St Ignatius the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 29, 2016

The Rick Steves tour members getting settled at the 16th century villa and now Kazbek Hotel’s outdoor restaurant in Dubrovnik, Croatia, for our final group dinner last night. May 29, 2016

For starters, we had broccoli cream, cocktail sauce with scallops. Delicious! May 29, 2016

The main dish was sea bream with black polenta, tomato sauce and olive oil. Yum! May 29, 2016

And dessert, at least my choice for dessert, was the chocolate mouse. But it was more like a chocolate molten cake because when I cut it open, warm chocolate oozed out. Heavenly! May 29, 2016

Enjoying our group’s farewell dinner with tour mate Julie at a 16th century villa and now Kazbek Hotel’s outdoor restaurant in Dubrovnik, Croatia.

Today ends 30 days of two back to back Rick Steves tours. The first one was the 16-day “Best of Eastern Europe” tour and this one, the 14-day “Best of the Adriatic” tour. Thank you Peter Polczman and Tina Hiti, the lead tour guides for each tour and to Sanel Maric. Tomorrow I fly back to Budapest to begin my Cosmos 13-day “Treasures of the Balkans and Transylvania” tour which includes the countries of Serbia, Bulgaria and Romania.

I spent today, my last day in Dubrovnik, Croatia, walking the grand city wall that surrounds the old town with Carol and Dennis, tour mates from both of my Rick Steves tours who like me stayed over another day in Dubrovnik. This was a WOW experience.

The medieval City Wall is included in the World Heritage List from UNESCO as far back as 1970. In addition to the fortifications, the city walls are protected additionally with two round towers, 12 quadrilateral forts, five bastions and two corner towers.

And the views, from the sea of orange roofs on one side to the actual Sea of the Adriatic made for a compelling little more than two hour walk and picture taking extravaganza.

Walked the wall this morning with Carol and Dennis whom I’ve traveled with for the past 30 days in our back to back Rick Steves tours. Here they are at the Pile Gate, the entrance to the old town. Carol in the red shirt and Dennis is in the white shirt standing next to her. May 30, 2016

From the scenic mile-long City Walls walk in the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. The 15th century wall encircles the old town. May 30, 2016

Me, after climbing up the many stairs, to begin the walk along the City Wall of old town in Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 30, 2016

The views from the medieval City Wall in the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 30, 2016

The gorgeous sea of orange roof tops of the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia, from the medieval City Wall. May 30, 2016

The old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia, is surrounded by a medieval City Wall with its intricate and complex system of forts, bastions, casemates, towers and detached forts. May 30, 2016

The view of the orange roof tops and the Adriatic Sea from the City Wall surrounding the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 30, 2016

The old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia, is surrounded by a medieval City Wall with its intricate and complex system of forts, bastions, casemates, towers and detached forts. May 30, 2016

The medieval City Wall surrounding the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 30, 2016

The Minceta Tower of the medieval City Wall surrounding the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 30, 2016

A view of a part of the medieval City Wall through another part of the City Wall surrounding the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 30, 2016

The medieval City Wall surrounding the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 30, 2016

The view of the orange roof tops and the Adriatic Sea from the City Wall surrounding the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 30, 2016

The view of the orange roof tops and the clouds covering the hillside from the City Wall surrounding the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 30, 2016

The medieval City Wall surrounding the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 30, 2016

A view from the medieval City Wall of the main promenade, the Placa or Stradun, in the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 30, 2016

The medieval City Wall surrounding the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 30, 2016

Me at the medieval City Wall surrounding the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 30, 2016

The harbor and the medieval City Wall surrounding the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. May 30, 2016

After the City Wall walk, I took my sweaty and thirsty self out to lunch at the Oliva Pizzeria in the old town of Dubrovnik, Croatia. I’m such a creature of habit that this was my third day in a row eating at this restaurant and enjoying this Piquant pizza with a Radler beer. Radler is beer with lemon and it, along with the pizza, were delicious. May 30, 2016

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